The Power of You: Keeping Things Personal in Business

thinkstockphotos-183934815

In the world of business, one of the most powerful assets that you have is the deep, emotional, and very real connection that you’re capable of making with the people around you. It doesn’t matter if you’re talking to a prospect or a client or a superior or someone in between, and it certainly makes no difference what industry you’re operating in – this connection is everything. The key word here, however, is “real.” If you talk to someone and see them as little more than a line item on a balance sheet, they’re going to be able to tell and your relationship with that person is going to suffer. This is where the power of “you” comes in handy.

Putting the “Relations” Back in “Relationship”

To boil this concept down to its essentials, think for a moment about how irritating it is to write an impassioned letter to a business expressing some important concern or criticism that you have only to receive a standard form letter in return. You poured your heart and soul into this issue, making sure to detail every last grievance you had and that every word got the importance of your message across loud and clear. In exchange, you got a letter that has been sent out 1,000 times before that was probably sitting on a server somewhere, just waiting for an intern to swap out [INSERT NAME HERE] with your actual name.

It doesn’t make you feel good and it certainly doesn’t make you feel appreciated. It might even make you think twice about doing business with that particular company again. Though this is a simplification of the issue you face when you keep everyone at arm’s length, it is actually quite an apt example and is something that you absolutely need to keep in mind moving forward.

“You” and the Customer

There are a number of different things that you can do to help deepen this emotional connection, even if you aren’t actually speaking directly to someone. It’s all about the language that you use and how you’re using it. Consider a promotional poster outlining all of the great features that a particular product brings with it into the marketplace. You could have the best product in the world, but if you’re just listing features in a series of bullet points it will still come across as a bit cold and distant. That emotional connection just won’t be there.

Now, consider what happens when you re-frame the exact same message to directly address the reader. “X feature helps YOU solve Y problem in your life.” Suddenly, you’re sending forward the exact same message, but in a way that doesn’t seem like he’s being recited by a faceless corporation. It sounds like it’s coming from a friend. Ultimately, if you want to instill loyalty in your customers, that’s exactly what they need to think of you as – a trusted friend that they know they can depend on and turn to in their time of need.

We believe that this is one of the many ways that “you” will come in handy. Remember that everyone you deal with, from the customers who buy your products or services, to the vendors and suppliers that you depend on, to your own employees and more, you’re dealing with unique individuals who always deserve to be treated as such. It doesn’t require a lot of work to keep things personal in the world of business, and the benefits will pay dividends for a lifetime.

Advertisements

Building a Community No One Can Resist

People enjoy feeling as though they belong. It’s a part of our universal desire to form strong bonds with other people and feel connected to those around us. From student clubs to neighborhood organizations, this desire plays out across our nation in a variety of settings.

This desire also has a firm place in marketing. One of the best ways to encourage brand loyalty involves encouraging customers to feel as though they’re part of an exclusive group when they use your brand. When people feel connected to your company and to other users, they’re more likely to become repeat customers and even recommend your brand to others. Few companies have enjoyed the success Facebook has in this regard.

The early days of Facebook

Back when Facebook was first developed, it was available only to users at colleges and universities, and they had to have a .edu email address to register. This effort to create a distinctive market resulted in a very strong community among Facebook users. Many users today still reminisce about the early days when their parents and grandparents weren’t registered and it was just a way to communicate with their college friends. In many ways, the desire to belong to this exclusive ‘club’ of Facebook users helped the company grow exponentially.

Revising the Facebook exclusivity

After a few years of immense popularity with the college-age crowd, Facebook began to open registration up to people outside their original targeted demographic. At first, this upset many people who had eagerly waited until their college years to join, only to find that everyone else could now, too. In recent years, there have been some reports of the younger generations leaving as they search for a platform that allows them to converse with their friends without their parents and grandparents seeing their comments. Overall, however, the platform has continued to grow. This is because the developers have taken the time to still encourage feelings of community among users, even though everyone can now join.

How have they managed to maintain this feeling?

  1. Newsfeeds update users to their friends’ activities as soon as they log in. This offers a unique way to stay in contact with friends and family. Users know they would lose all this information if they were to leave.
  2. Games and similar activities encourage users to work together on the platform for entertainment, connecting people by common interests within the platform.
  3. Since Facebook use is so prevalent, the default is to use the platform. People expect to be able to connect and communicate with others through it. Those who don’t have a page risk losing out on a key form of communication.

How businesses can learn from Facebook

Facebook has managed to build a community so strong that it appeals to nearly every demographic. Few companies will have the reach to accomplish this, but they will be able to strengthen their own connections to encourage customer loyalty and retention.

For example, try building portions of your company website that allow and encourage communication between customers. You can occasionally interject advice as needed, but in general try to keep the conversations between end-users, to encourage a connection between your customers.

Loyalty programs and rewards programs are also helpful. By offering prizes to those who use your products and services regularly, you’ll show your appreciation and encourage customers to return to earn more. Publicly rewarding customers, such as showcasing particular people for their loyalty, can also help enhance brand loyalty. Even promotions such as free t-shirts can help customers feel connected to your company.

Facebook has shown the business world what is possible when a brand manages to build such a strong sense of community that users cannot imagine doing without it. Companies of all sizes can take some of the lessons to heart and begin to build their own communities. If you’re interested in developing materials to help reach your consumer base and encourage them to be a part of your community, reach out to us. We’d be happy to help you!